Summer time! (New Look 6483; Marfy 1913; Pattern Runway Sweet Scalloped Shorts)

Whew, long title.  I almost didn’t blog these four interchangeable items, but I love how the Marfy top and white shorts came out.  I had to share.  These two outfits make use of old fabrics (the tops) and new (the shorts).  And I now own three pairs of non-running shorts (all Pattern Runway). (Everything was worn and washed a few times before picture time, my pressing needs some work!)

Top: New Look 6483 View C

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I need more tops in my wardrobe, so one day while browsing at JoAnns, I picked up this New Look pattern.  It’s pretty basic, and pretty easy.  I meant to make view E, but cut out C by mistake.  The fabric is a leftover linen print (Marcy Tilton) from when I made this summer dress a couple of years ago.  When I was cleaning out my fabric closet, I found I had one more yard.  The fabric has a bit of body, but works with this loose-fitting top.

I had no problems with the instructions, and I will repeat this basic, but with modifications.  First, the neckline is higher than I expected, but you don’t need the button/loop closure (or hook/eye) in the back, at least for views C, D, and E.  Second, I don’t really find the straight hemline with split side seams a flattering look for me, so I may convert the hem to a curved shirt-tail hem next time.  Third, I suspect the boxy look will be more body conscious with a drapey fabric (recommended on the envelop).

Top: Marfy 1913 Repeat

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Marfy 1913, from the website.

I loved the Marfy top the first time I made it – but I didn’t wear it often because it felt small.  I must have washed it and shrunk it.  When I compared it to the pattern pieces to make this one, it was much smaller than the pieces!

This time, though, I did add some width.  Unconventionally, I added width at the center front and center back at the fold line (shifted the pattern off the fold by 1/4 inch). I also added two inches to the length.  Once again, I didn’t gather the hemline with elastic, but left it to tuck in to shorts/pants/skirt.

The fabric is a silk cotton voile from Milly that I purchased in 2014 from Gorgeous Fabrics. It was softer and more sheer than I wanted for the original project, so was stashed.  It was still sheer and soft, of course, so I decided to line the top with an off white silk crepe de chine.  This made finishing the keyhole/slit opening in the back as well as the armholes far simpler.  I LOVE THIS TOP!  It’s pretty on, cheerful in the very, very, hot sun.  It even held up to a complete drenching when I was caught in a downpour at my son’s outdoor swim practice last week.

It looks way better on me than in these photos (but too lazy to do even a bathroom selfie):

Shorts:  Pattern Runway Sweet Scalloped Shorts Repeat

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I loved the first version of these (and still wear them). I’ve been meaning to make another pair for some time.  I made two pair.  I really love the very clear instructions, and I like the use of differing seam allowances (1/4 inch and 3/8ths inch) to eliminate trimming (which I rarely do evenly). I made a size medium (I wear 14 in big four, often larger).  I also love the flattering lines and good fit.

I didn’t do the welt pockets.  I started with the navy shorts, intending to do the welt pockets, but the fabric had too much stretch and all my stitching lines for the welts were warped and wavy (even with interfacing).  I wanted to get these done, so I carefully picked out the work and moved on.

The navy shorts are a cotton twill from Fabric Mart fabrics.  The fabric was super inexpensive, with more lycra than I would like.  I struggled at times to manage the stretch.  The fabric is what it is, and makes a fine pair of shorts.  And yes, it looks like I need to press them again (ditto for the white).

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The white shorts are amazing!  This “pique texture” white cotton from Gorgeous Fabrics was perfect for this pattern.  (I bought it early June, so I think there is still some left).  I love the Milly/Marfy top with the white shorts!  So summer!

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Beach/Pool Cover-up: New Look 6575

My fifth summer in Florida, with the beach close by and a pool in the yard, but I’m only just now getting around to making a beach cover-up.  This is in part due to my indecision on what I wanted.  Finally, I have something, and I’m quite pleased with the result.

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I chose New Look 6575 and modified it.  This 2018 Simplicity group release has no description, but the lines looked workable for me.  I originally bought it to make a tunic, but was worried about the low neckline. I made the medium since I definitely wanted a loose look.

It recommended challis, chambray, cotton lawn, double georgette, gauze, soft linen and silk types.  I chose a very inexpensive rayon challis I purchased from Fabric Mart.  It’s very shifty, and printed off grain, so I didn’t use it for the project originally intended. I figured it wouldn’t matter as much here, though I wasn’t able to match the pattern very well.

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I added trim:  a beautiful embroidered cotton lace from Joyce Trimming.  I ordered two widths and hand-stitched them together to create the width I needed.  I ordered 4 yards and used all but a couple of inches!!!  (And the cut was generous.)  I replaced the front band on view B, and added the lace to the completed sleeve and shirt hems.  Adding the lace effectively lengthened the cover-up to just above the knee.  It adds a bit of modesty, without making it too boring.

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The directions for this were fine, though I deviated at several points. To add the lace to the front, I sewed a 5/8ths narrow hem to the front (stay stitch first!).  I then stitched the lace to the front pieces.  I added the fabric band to the back neck, then stitched the shoulder/upper sleeve seams.  Then I applied the facing for the back band.

The other change was to the casing.  I  stitched the “waist” with the 3/4 seam as requested, but rather than the convoluted method they suggested, I serged the seam together, pressed down. Finally, I top stitched 1/2 inch away from the waist seam to create the casing.

I was right! This is very low cut – below the point of the bra.  Perfect for a swim cover-up, less so for everyday wear.  I was surprised at how flattering something that low cut could be on me though.  And I love the finished product.

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Channeling Roman Holiday: M7906 & NL6407

I’ve been sewing – a lot.  I have multiple projects nearly done, and several more on the horizon.  I’ve been making up for lost time.  And I’m not very interested in stopping to blog about it.  But, none-the-less, here we are.  This was the outfit that got me to spontaneously buy a new (but still basic) sewing machine.  It also strongly reminds of me of ingenue Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday.

Having thin, attractive models sells patterns!  And this is true of the very popular McCalls 7906.  I made the view the model is wearing, but I’m heavier – and so was my fabric choice, a stretch cotton sateen.  I knew I needed some new white shirts/blouses, so I paired it with New Look  6407, view E, in white silk faille.  Both fabrics are from Gorgeous Fabrics.

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McCall’s 7906:  midi button front skirt: There’s not much to say about this pattern – it’s very simple to construct.  The instructions are good and the style is very popular right now.  It is roomy, comfortable, with pockets.  I’d say there are really only three challenges to this pattern, easily surmountable.

First:  make sure you measure and mark your pleats carefully.  This will just make it look nicer.  They are stitched flat for the top 3.25 inches.  It’s a very sharp look.  Second:  the carriers.  I’ve never done them before, so this was new to me.  I’d say I was only semi-successful in doing them well. More practice.  Third: buttonholes.  Okay, this isn’t really a challenge, but my machine is a 4-step buttonhole, and it doesn’t like to go backwards.  They always turn out hideous.  No exception here. What’s the point of perfect, precision stitching only to be marred by ugly buttonholes?  After this, I bought a new machine, one that does automatic buttonholes in several styles.

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Bathroom selfie, with a RTW blouse.
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Back view, with RTW blouse.

The fabric is a stretch cotton sateen, so it’s actually a little loose on me, but super comfortable to wear (I cut a size 14).  I like the skirt, but I see it as more of a running errands skirt than a work skirt, at least in this configuration. Or, wear to work on casual days.

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Ugly buttonhole.

New Look 6407:  view E, short sleeve fitted shirt with banded collar: I love this shirt.  I don’t like the fit.  I’m making it again, in the same fabric, if I can get it.  This was made on the new machine, and wow, wow, wow.  It has speed control, which means I made fewer mistakes, and was far more precise in my stitching!

I’d never worked with silk faille before, and it’s difficult to press. Think of it like a good wool suiting and use a clapper.  I didn’t here.

Again, I’m really happy with the construction – I like my own work (if not my pressing).  How did I miss the fit so badly?  I tissue fit – and it suggested that I should make a 12, grading out to a 14.  No issues with torso length, which I usually have.  Tissue fitting also didn’t indicate an issue with the bust darts.  But this is a fitted style, and I should have done a 14, easing to 16 (sigh), especially with silk faille, which doesn’t like stress on the seams.

The bust darts are way too low.  I’d say this was an issue for me, but you can see it on the dress form too.  I like this pattern and style enough to play with it in the muslin a bit before remaking it.  So, as much as I love the shirt, it’s not flattering to have pulling at the waist, and excess fabric under the bust.  I’ll donate this version.

And the button holes?   OMG, they were so much easier.  The right size, perfectly shaped, rounded button holes.  Evenly dense throughout.

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The skirt needs pressing.  I wore it to Tampa last week, and it got crushed in the car.  I only gave it a cursory pressing for pictures.

I bought a Janome again, this time the JW8100. It’s a beginner’s computerized machine.  It has definite flaws, but I’m going to sew on it for a month before giving you the pros and cons of this machine.