Fitting via Text (3 more McCalls 7079)

Last fall my niece asked kindly for some new skirts and a dress for her bunny.  She lives several states away, so I asked my sister for some new measurements.  I also asked her what my niece wore in RTW for her favorite dress.  Comparing the measurements, I determined that a size 14 (girls) would be the right size, so started on McCalls 7079.

Well, the dress hangs on her and the bunny dress would not button shut.  Fortunately, the dress fit her American Girl doll.  We’re doing this fitting via text message.

I cut out another dress for each and made some adjustments.  A size 12, plus raising the neckline another 1/2 inch (it’s far larger than the envelop shows).  And I added 4 inches to the bunny dress.  I got them there in time for Christmas, and voila!  Perfect.  I immediately cut out two more dresses, thinking I could send them in time for Christmas, but only made them this weekend.

The black and pink floral is a poly ponte from Gorgeous Fabrics.  The brown floral is poly ITY from Gorgeous Fabrics.   The green velvet (Marcy Tilton) is the same velvet I used for my shirt. I didn’t get a new picture of the bunny dress.

IMG_3295

 

Hope she likes them. I’m partial to the brown floral.

2018-sign-001-copy.jpg

Advertisements

First sewing of the year… is not for me.

IMG_0001

That’s right, I’m sewing patches onto a BSA uniform.  My husband became den leader of our little tiger scout’s den this year.  I remember getting all my sewing-related badges for Girl Scouts… wonder if they do this for the boys?  I hope so!

Next on the agenda is Kwik Sew 3123 (navy wool short coat) for my husband.  Almost finished with the muslin; next will be to customize it for what he wants.  Not sure exactly what I will sew after that.  The fabrics that just arrived from Emma One Sock will likely be stitched up quickly:  a winter white 8 gore skirt and a teal ponte dress.  I might squeeze that dress in later this week while cutting out the jacket proper…

It’s cold out everyone (even here in Florida)… stay warm.

The list is long and ever changing…

2018-sign-001-copy.jpg

 

Last Make of the Year: Paco Peralta top (Vogue 1567)

Let’s finish the year with something easy and festive.  I cut this top out before Christmas, but I’ve been so busy (like everyone) that I spent only 5-10 minutes a day on it.  I’m not fond of the skirt (I have wide hips), but the top looked simple (and I thought it would be done to wear Christmas day).

Vogue 1567 is a close-fitting top with dolman sleeves (wow – haven’t seen them in a while).  With only two pattern pieces, the emphasis is on the fabric and construction.  I chose a poly stretch velvet in green (Sage Shimmer Velvet) from Marcy Tilton. It’s sold out of course.  It’s knit, with no rolling and easy to sew.

Vogue 1567 Paco Peralta, from Vogue webpage.

The pattern itself is fairly simple and the instructions are fine.   I made several construction choices to make it my own.

  1. Instead of double stitched hems, I stitched the seams on my straight stitch machine (pulling lightly as I stitched).  I finished all seams on the serger.  I’m not confident in sewing a straight line with a 5/8ths seam on the serger – though I am with the 3/8ths – has to do with the cutting knife position on the one I bought.
  2. In the directions, the back facing, sleeves and hem are all turned under 1/4 inch and then top-stitched with two rows of stitching.  I didn’t turn under any of these edges; rather, I finished the edges with the serger for a less bulky finish with the velvet.  I only top stitched the back v to give it more stability and reduce stretching.  I wanted a softer hem on the sleeves and waist, sew I hand-sewed these hems.
  3. I will likely take in the neckline a bit (1/2 inch each side), the neck is very wide, and I don’t think I did it quite right (see below).  I will also add lingerie straps.
  4. I added my customary 1.5 inches in the torso for being long waisted.

So, I have never quite gotten the technique right for the fold-over facing on these type tops. Something is always out of whack for me.  I followed the instructions carefully, and lined up my notches, but the shoulder seams seem slightly off (see the picture).  Hard to describe, but the front facing is turned tot he outside, along the fold line, over back, basted, then stitched.  Then you turn the front facing to inside along the fold line, and press lightly.  Anyway, they are always a bit wonky.

IMG_0012
See, a bit wonky.

This was my inspiration top:  a Vince Camuto velvet boxy top in green I found on Nordstrom.  I like mine better!

05127577_zi_ivy_green
The inspiration top.  But the construction looked terrible!

I’m pleased with the top. I’ll post a picture of me in it with the skirt I’m making to go with it.  I might make another one, but the sewing agenda for the new year is quite ambitious.  Right off the top: a coat for DH, two dresses for my niece, two skirts, another top, and two dresses….

And my version, complete:

IMG_0009

IMG_0011

Goodbye 2017, Hello 2018

Ah, the year-end reflective post.  Every year it’s the same: didn’t sew enough, need to work on this or that, plan to do X in the future.  Well it’s true.

This year, my plans, as always, were ambitious.  Health and family issues kept me away from the machine, but I managed to continue stockpiling fabrics.  Actually, I practiced restraint until Gorgeous Fabrics announced the farewell sale.

I find that when I sew, all areas of my life bloom.  My creativity increases in all areas.  My cooking is more adventurous.  I start ripping out plants in the yard (working on a Florida friendly habitat).  And my work productivity goes way up.

I did not sew much last year, but I did tackle a few old projects and worked on more ambitious projects, like two Rucci outfits, a couple of dresses using couture, and the Donna Karan jacket.  I haven’t had a need for much, so haven’t felt as driven.

This year, the need is still low to moderate, but the desire is high.  I  will continue to focus on outfits that are appropriate for work, my climate, and for tooling around town.  We’re planning a big overseas trip, so travel clothes are on the agenda.  More linen.  More cotton.  I have my eye on Paco Peralta, plus Vintage Balmain, Dior and Montana (and, and, and).  I need something for a wedding in California in March (a guipure skirt and silk top?) We’ll see what happens!

I feel my sewing skills are improving – at least on the technical level.  I still feel challenged with the serger.  And the biggest issue I have is fitting the self.  I have no fitting partner, and my body shape is changing as I go through menopause.  I have finally recognized that I need to sew for now, not the body I think I’ll have if I lose a couple pounds, flatten the tummy, tone the legs.  Well-fitting clothing is far more flattering than beautifully made clothes that pull and are uncomfortable. I find myself shopping Nordstrom for fill-in pieces (that also don’t fit well, but …)

I never really join in the various contests on the interwebs.  But this year I’ll be participating in the ready-to-wear fast Sarah Gunn is sponsoring at Goodbye Valentino.  The rules are fairly permissive:  I can wear what I have, just not buy anything new (accept accessories).  I have a decent closet and I know how to sew… so Goodbye Nordstrom (for clothes anyway).

Here’s to 2018!

At long last, the Rucci dress is finished (Vogue 1239)

What a journey with this dress!  I bought the pattern in 2011 when it came out.  I found the fabric in 2012.  The envelop back said edge-to-edge lining, china silk, 60″.  I searched forever for a matching blue silk habotai in a wide width.  Finally, I took the pattern out and studied it:  not edge-to-edge, but facings, and 45″ would do fine.  Started enthusiastically.  Started sewing the lining and remembered:  I absolutely hate working with and wearing silk habotai. Ordered silk CDC, cut it out, and… stopped.  I needed to make Halloween costumes.  It stared me in the face for months into three years, and finally, I got back to it last week (enthusiastically, too).

From Vogue’s website.

I was ambivalent last night when I tried it on, but wore it to work anyway.  It’s the first thing I’ve made (that could be worn to work) that ever received open compliments, from the cleaning woman to colleagues to students.  They loved it.  By the time I had gotten to work, I felt good in it, and decided that my ambivalence had to do with two things:  I know there are many small errors  and that I’m not used to being so covered up  (warm climate).  So, as the day wore on, I felt more at ease with the look, though it really is pretty fancy for work, and maybe is best for an evening of culture.

As for the look: some have described it as sci-fi, or lab coat.  That’s what I was expecting, an ultra-modern look.  But it felt more like the 1950s.  My husband said it looked nice, and had a 1950s vibe (before I even asked).  He also said it reminded him of June Cleaver.  I was not annoyed – it’s exactly what I thought too!  So, I donned my grandmother’s pearls and headed off to work.

I’ve blogged this before here, here, here, and here.  But now the details, plus pictures (including me):

The pattern:  Vogue 1239, Vogue American Designer CHADO ralph rucci. Close-fitting, lined to edge dress has shoulder darts, side front pockets, inside ties, hook and eye closure.

The fabric:  The pattern calls for a crisp fabric (poplin, taffeta, shantung), which is necessary to get the look pictured. I chose a silk poplin (Isaac Mizrahi) in deep blue from Mood Fabrics.  I lined it with a very dark navy silk crepe de chine from Gorgeous Fabrics.

The directions:  were mostly good.  I didn’t have any issues except with steps 49 and 59.  In 49, you are directed to cut one upper front band lining section along line indicated in pattern tissue.  I apparently cut both when I cut the lining.  I  basted to see what would happen, and it was perfect.  So, I’m pretty sure you are supposed to cut both (and the pattern tissue seems to indicate this too).

Step 59 was a real problem. This was finishing those beautiful sleeves.  Well, I got mine done, but they aren’t as lovely as the photograph.  For the life of me I couldn’t figure out what the directions wanted me to do there. So, I pressed under my edges, basted them wrong sides together, very carefully fell-stitched (or slip) them together by hand, then did my edge stitching.

Other things I did: I made a size 12, adding one inch to lengthen the torso.  I made a muslin, so this is what I concluded I needed.  I think now another half inch in length would have been optimal. I made no other adjustments on sizing.  After wearing it all day, I think I would decrease the circumference of the sleeve openings a bit.  They are on the long size, and make my skinny wrist even skinnier looking.

My initial tests with thread suggested a longer stitch for the edge stitching.  After several tests, I decided I got the cleanest look with edge, but no top stitching, silk thread and a length of 2.5.

The dress has no interfacing, and since I was not top stitching (which helps give the dress its structure), I interfaced all the facings with silk organza. In addition, to help keep the neckline from stretching, I basted organza selvedges along the neckline.

I reinforced my corners using the couture method from Claire Schaeffer’s book.

Finally, the dress may channel June Cleaver, but it’s a risky dress. With only ties, the belt and one hook and eye to hold it in place… well. Before I left for work, I added a snap at the bust line.  I also moved the eye over toward the side by nearly an inch.  The hook and eye is a little high and wanted to come undone, so I found myself tying the belt a little above my natural waistline.  I will move it down slightly, and add a second hook and eye.

Though it took me over night to warm to the dress, I like it. I would consider making it again, if I found a more casual fabric that suited the lines of the dress.  Oh, and I LOVE the pockets on this dress!

I’m not so great with photographs. I use an iPhone to get selfies. On top of that, my vision is such that I can’t see what’s on the screen without the reading glasses.  My contacts only correct for long vision.  Sigh, I need bifocals. Pictures of the odyssey:

IMG_0969
Yes, I pressed the fabric before continuing.

IMG_3230

IMG_3235
Blurry, but look, it’s fall in Florida. Or winter. Okay, its 80 out.
IMG_3233
Focused, and you can see the oranges.  But I added the snap after this picture.  Did I say this fabric is impossible to press?  And puckers? The puckering was why I eliminated the top stitching and kept only the edge.

This one wore me (Butterick 5354)

Elber Albaz, former designer of House Lanvin revealed in an interview, “What is your job as a designer? To unveil the body or to cover it?” He went on to say, “…It was then that I realised that fashion is not really about the body at all. Its essence is simple: to make the woman look beautiful, to make her fly.”


This top (Butterick 5354, view D) doesn’t aspire to Lanvin in the slightest, but I liked the drawings, the description and the line drawings.  Albaz’s sentiment is still relevant: fashion should make you feel confident, beautiful, enhance the best of you.  But it didn’t even make me flap wings.  This is a design that could work (with some re-working) in a VERY drapey fabric, but don’t consider it with any fabric with body.  It covers the body, adds weight, and is headed to the donate pile.

The fabric is from Gorgeous Fabrics – I bought it after working with the navy rayon doubleknit (and during Ann’s closeout sale).  I love the fabric, and am kicking myself for wasting it here.  I have enough left for a sleeveless top, maybe.


Okay, other than the fact that it’s just not flattering (though super easy), here were my  main issues:

  1. The neckline is not as wide as pictured in either the drawings on the front or in the line drawings.  Views B, C and D indicate a wide neckline (I made view D).  It’s more of a circle around the neck (View A somewhat indicates this, but is still more revealing than reality).  It’s a very, very modest neckline compared to these drawings.
  2. The shoulders are too narrow.  Yes, I know, muslin.  This isn’t usually a problem I have – since I have narrow shoulders.  But the shoulder lines are well inside where they need to be flattering.  I made a 12, my usual size, and many on PatternReview indicated sizing down.  Again, where the shoulder meets the sleeve cap is more like View A than View D.
  3. The facing is fiddly.  I measured carefully, I cut carefully, I attached carefully.  I understitched.  I trimmed and notched.  I pressed.  The facing rolls out.  In fact, it’s not drafted properly, as it won’t lay flat on the inside. The outside curve of the facing is a bit short, forcing the facing to pull up – and is perhaps why issue number one is occurring.


Could I have fixed this with a muslin?  Yes.

Win some, lose some.  Moving on.

(Sorry, can’t seem to get the lighting right with my iPhone).

A little Florida sunshine…

I know many of you are chilled these days, but here’s some warmth:


The citrus harvest has begun.  We have been picking Persian, Kaffir, and Key limes for a week or two.  Today we picked red lime, Meyer lemon (above), and our first orange. 

We didn’t get a heavy fruit set this year, and the grapefruit is still too young, but we’ll take what we can get.  The Meyer lemon did well, which is great for cooking.  Anyone want to share a favorite recipe featuring citrus?

But first, have some lemonade:

Double Knit Comfort in Vintage Style (Vogue 9187)

I have some things I want to finish, and a few new, more complex projects on the way.  But first, a quick comfortable, yet stylish top.  Vogue 9187 is a re-release of a 1960 close-fitting top.  I think I have a version of the original pattern from my grandmother (it has buttons up the back).

img_3195I first did the muslin on this sometime last year, with handkerchief linen in mind.  This top is too close-fitting for linen.  I had some of the rayon/spandex double knit left over from making my niece a dress, so I thought I would adapt the pattern for a stable knit.

img_3196-e1510451632949.jpg
I made view D, in a size 12.  There is very little ease here (great for a knit).  I eliminated the back zipper (placing the seam line on the fold).  I lengthened the torso 2 inches; this one barely came to my belly button, so that was necessary.  It’s still a bit short, but since it’s designed to be worn untucked, it’s okay.  For a bit more wearing ease, I sewed 3/8 inch side seams.  This led to some gaping under the arms.  To fix this, I tapered to 5/8th seams under the arm, starting about two inches down.

 

If I had given it any thought, I would have changed how to do the facings for the neck and arm holes.   With no back zipper, you can’t simply pull through, as instructed.  So, I stitched the neckline, under-stitched, and pressed.  Then I use the techniques from inserting a lining from Susan Khalje’s Couture Dress class to hand sew the facings in for the arm holes.  Took longer, worked just fine.

I love this top.  I will probably try the true vintage one I have first though before doing this pattern soon (I have a duppioni in mind and the buttons down the back would be pretty).

And, yes, I know, I have to get some pictures of these things with me in them.  Just haven’t wanted to photograph myself lately.

A basic skirt: Very Easy Vogue 9209

After the Donna Karan jacket, I wanted something easy.  I chose this skirt. Yes, very easy, but it still took a couple of weeks to finish.  By that I mean, I did everything but the buttons/buttonholes in an evening, got distracted by life for a couple weeks, then finished it.

IMG_3188

Vogue 9209 (from 2016) is a true wrap skirt for crepe, gabardine, ponte or lightweight denim.  I chose a khaki cotton twill with loads of stretch that I  purchased from Emma One Sock in 2014. I was saving it to make a pair of cropped khakis, but finally realized I would never do that. The fabric has a nice weight to it with some good stretch, so I thought this would make a versatile skirt. I used pro-weft supreme medium interfacing from Fashion Sewing Supply.  The beautiful, high-quality brass-toned buttons come from Pacific Trimming (I’m not sure where the flat clear buttons I used on the inside came from).

IMG_3177
Close-up of the buttons.

I followed the pattern instructions pretty faithfully, making the midi version (B). Since my weight gain has been in the tummy/hips, and I’ve always borderlined 12/14, I chose size 14 (but it still feels big in some ways).  The only thing I did different on this pattern was to underline all the facings (something by hand).  There is one error in the pattern – the placement for the interior buttons is off by two inches.

IMG_3178
The interior placement of the buttons is off.  I later trimmed the loose threads from those buttonholes.  Note that I machine under-stitched in most places, but around the corners of the buttons I under-stitched by hand.

The pictures were mostly taken after wearing all day (and thus show wrinkles). As for wearability?  This is an okay skirt. It’s sits 2 inches above the waist – and after two decades of low-waisted skirts/pants I’m just not accustomed to that.  The overlapping fabric means a lot of fabric in the front, and it sometimes bunches.  It only calls for two inside buttons, and I’m thinking more are necessary.  The one thing I don’t like?   How my knee kept grabbing the front hem/facing.  It stays modest (mostly closed) unlike many wrap skirts.

In the end, an easy skirt, but I’m beginning to think the pencil wrap skirt isn’t really my favorite style.

 

 

A big project, not hard, but big: Vogue 1440, Donna Karan fringe jacket OOP

No really, this jacket isn’t hard, but all the detail requires a great deal of attention and patience.  Much of the work is tedious, such as making all that piping.  Still, I am pretty happy with the result, and the style is more relaxed and fun than my usual work wear (which is highly tailored, traditional).   I encountered various problems throughout the project, these problems are addressed throughout the overview.

To start, from the pattern (Vogue 1440, OOP, though a 2015 release): “Unlined jacket has fringe, shoulder pads, draped front extending into back collar, wrong side shows, seam detail, no side or shoulder seams, two piece sleeves, mock band on upper sleeve, and continuous bias for piping and finishing seams.”  Note, nothing in the description discusses fit. It’s got a fair amount of ease, but most of that is due to the drape; the fit across the shoulders and upper back is semi-fitted to fitted.  And note – there is no provision for adjustments above the waist (such as for a long waist).  This is definitely a more casual jacket – or really – draped open cardigan.

Image result for vogue 1440
Vogue 1440, fashion photo from the pattern.

By the way, for this pattern, I had to study the instructions, the line drawings, AND the photograph to figure out some of the details.

About the fabric:  The pattern calls for lightweight tweeds, cotton blends.  I concur.  This jacket could easily overwhelm many frames, so keep the fabric on the lighter side. It’s also going to show on the reverse side, so keep that in mind.  I used a no longer available lightweight cotton blend tweed from Emma One Sock.  I scooped it up right when the pattern was released, not realizing that the reverse was going to show, primarily on those big collar “lapels”.  My reverse is more vanilla and black and far less red than the face side.  No worries, I cut it so the “face” was the reverse.  The collar covers all of the front of the jacket and also functions as the bottom few inches of the jacket.  If you look carefully you can see that the bottom front is a different shade than the rest of the jacket.  My fabric was also loosely woven, which meant that it shed to look at it. To help manage this, I cut the pattern pieces out, but left a wider seam, which I trim down with a rotary cutter right before sewing the pieces.  You don’t want to use fray block, because you do want some of those edges to fringe later. But I couldn’t wait to clean my sewing room.  It also stretched a bit on some of the pieces, leaving the shoulders slightly out of shape, so consider stay stitching some of the edges.

IMG_3121
If you look at the bottom of the jacket, you’ll note the reverse shows, and is a different color. I preferred the big collar part to be more red than vanilla/black, so I attached it in a way that favored it.

You’ll also need a lightweight fabric for all the piping and binding.  All of the piping pretty much is visible – but so is some of the binding.  I was glad in the end that I chose a lightweight silk charmeuse from Gorgeous Fabrics in one color for consistency across the jacket.

Notes on the The Piping and the Binding: it’s tedious.  The end.  No really, you will make 10 yards of piping.  You could purchase ready made, but most of that is low quality and fairly stiff.  For the piping, I found that using a piping foot (instead of the recommended zipper foot) to make the piping resulted in a tighter pipe. I also found that a piping foot worked better to construct the seams – except in those several occasions where you’ll have crossed seams.  With the crossed seams, use the zipper foot.  In addition, you definitely want to baste the piping as instructed, but you’ll also find that basting the seams together help keep the fabric from shifting.   By the way, in a size 12, I used slightly more than 9 yards of the 10 yards I made.

IMG_3115
Ten yards of piping.

I don’t recommend using the pattern piece to make the one long piece of continuous binding.  It’s only one inch wide, and if your fabric is at all thick you won’t have enough width for turn-of-the cloth (and in places you’ll have multiple layers to bind).  Cut your own strips, and slightly larger, which is what I did.

Fitting:  I read all the reviews on PatternReview, and almost everyone spent a great deal of time on their muslin.  In some cases, the changes really worked, but the jacket lost the original soul (though they looked amazing!).  I originally trimmed the pattern pieces to a size 10 (two years ago), but decided the better of it.  I had kept the trimmed edges and taped them back on.  When I made my muslin, I learned two things. One, that construction was pretty easy (excepting attaching the collar), and two, my regular size (12) fit best between the shoulders and across the back.  Wearing it today at work, I’m glad I did the 12, because I didn’t have much wiggle room when lecturing/gesticulating.  I also didn’t feel the need to add my usual length in the torso for my longer waist.  Remember, the muslin fabric is different than the fashion fabric.  I find the shoulders a bit more extended than I’m used too (about 1/4 inch); they fit the model this way as well. The sleeves are very long and narrow/fitted, which I really like.

Making the toile helps you practice matching up all those seams.  If you look at the fashion photo, you’ll note that the front piping all lines up on one side, but not the other.  They should match up according to the line drawing.  I basted seams to make sure mine met.

More on seam binding:  The inside of the jacket is quite beautifully finished.  It really is, except there are times when the seams don’t extend far enough to be caught up in the next set of seams, and you have a raggedy edge (as in the photo).  I used some silk embroidery thread and hand satin stitched over this.

IMG_3149
note how the seams aren’t caught in the binding and are hanging loose

Okay, let’s talk about the fringe, seam binding and grosgrain:  I bought this pattern immediately when it came out, so Vogue may have fixed this later in later editions.  I don’t know because they don’t have an errata on their website. But you will NOT cut enough fringe if you cut using the pattern piece they provide.  It’s simply not long enough, by quite a bit (about 12-15 inches if I remember).  The first three are fine for the top of the collar and the two sides, but the fourth piece for the bottom band is simply too short.  I had to piece the bottom band using leftover fringe from the sides of the collar.  It worked, but I was annoyed.  I also meant that I didn’t have any fringe left for the sleeves.  Since I wasn’t crazy about that, I didn’t care too much.

I studied the instructions and photo for quite some time to understand how the fringe would work and look after construction and fringing.  You apply the quarter inch grosgrain (I used petersham) to the placement line.  It doesn’t say how in the instructions – centered, top of the grosgrain to the bottom of the line or on top of the placement line.  I chose top of the grosgrain to the bottom of the placement line.  This results in a shorter fringe, which I preferred.

Second, you place the grosgrain on the right/face side of the fabric.  This means that all along the front, on that beautiful draping collar, is not grosgrain, but binding.  For me, that was far less attractive (see photo). The bound edge is not stitched down, and due the grosgrain placement, left an opening of about 3/8″ inch.  So, I used my leftover grosgrain and applied it over the binding.  Better, but now I  no longer had any grosgrain for the sleeves.  I was okay with no fringe on the sleeve, but I had planned to keep the grosgrain detail on the sleeves.   If you don’t do what I did (cover the binding), you’ll use far less grosgrain than the 5 yards listed in the notions.

IMG_3125
This is the front of that big lapel.  The seam binding is not tacked down here and can flip up. You could either top-stitch the loose edge (not in instructions) or apply the grosgrain for consistency (also not in the instructions).  I chose grosgrain. (This looked worse IRL than in the photo).

Take a real close look at the photo of the collar in the fashion shot.  The fringe is not fringed all the way to the black trim – that’s because the grosgrain (on the reverse of the collar) is lower than the binding.

And finally, the finishing details.  These were almost completely missing from the instructions.  Oh, sure, fringe the fringe, hem the sleeves and go.  Nope. All the tails of the binding are mingled in with the fringe and they are ugly.  You can’t fringe near the seams (including the mitered corners and CB seam).  The photo on the left below is before, with both the binding and piping hanging down. I painstakingly undid the stitching up to the grosgrain and careful trimmed excess binding and piping out of sight.  No need to finish them any more because they are caught in the two rows of stitching for the grosgrain. The photo on the right is the trimmed and completely fringed edge. Finally, you may find that you’ll have to lightly tack down some of the seams on the inside, if they still don’t behave after pressing and a clapper.

Overall: I like it, I’ll wear it, but it’s not likely I’ll make it again.  Still, it looks great, and made me really think about my own sewing skills and how to improve them. I left for work before it was light enough for pictures, but here it is on the dress form before I finished hemming the sleeves (they are basted in place) or doing a final pressing:

IMG_3151
Front view.
IMG_3153
Back view, before final pressing.