Paco Peralta 8-gore skirt in ivory wool.

I love skirts.   I love wearing them and making them.  An even though I likely have a dozen gored skirt patterns, I had to buy another one. I wanted to try out Paco Peralta’s patterns from Etsy.

IMG_0005

They are on amazing paper – not thick printer paper, not that easy to destroy super-thin tissue the Big 4 use.  I know, it’s just paper, but it really elevated the experience.  There isn’t much to this pattern – a gore you use 8 times, a one inch fold over waistband, plus lining pieces (cut four).

The patterns don’t come with instructions – but again, this is a simple skirt, so you don’t really need them.  He does have a few pointers on his blog, especially if you are using the godets.

IMG_0006
Doesn’t fit the dress form well (it’s not a great dress form), and a bit wrinkled from handling…

Here’s what I did:

 

  1. Made a muslin, because I wasn’t sure of fit/ease.  I’m wearing a 14 in the big 4 these days, and the large had very little ease (I made the large).  The benefit of making the muslin was that I now had additional pattern pieces to cut the skirt.
  2. I sewed four gores together (from the bottom up) to form the front, and four gores (bottom up) for the back, leaving room for a center back invisible zipper.  I then sewed the front and back together.
  3. Paco mentions that you can change the drape depending on how you finish the seams.  If you press them open, you’ll get more flare.  If you press them to one side, you’ll get more of a pleat (though I don’t think that’s the right word).  I pressed them open.
  4. After inserting the invisible zipper, I attached the waistband, but used Susan Khalje’s instructions from Linen and Cotton.  This required the use of petersham. First, staystitch the waist seamline. Second, snip the waist band to the stay stitching.  She points out that the pattern continues to narrow above the waistline, but the waistline is the most narrow part.  Therefore, snipping is necessary for any waistband that sits at the waist.  Trimming the seams, as instructed in most patterns, will likely leave a hard ridge.  Then attach the waistband, foldover, and finish.
  5. Before I folded over to finish, I basted the lining to the stay-stitching.  I also extended the waistband when I cut it out by one inch to allow an underlap, which will have hooks/eyes and a snap.  Susan Khalje suggests that the underlap has a cleaner finish and is more comfortable to wear.
  6. Finally, the hems: instead of the hem allowance he suggests, I hemmed both the skirt and the lining with a narrow machine hem using Claire Schaeffer’s method.  I attached the hem to the skirt with french tacks.

img_0008.jpg

IMG_0004

IMG_0007

I LOVE this style skirt, very classic, and this one comes to the center of the knee on me. I will make this again, and I feel my closet is bare without a couple of swishy skirts.  The next one will likely have a side zipper, for which I will use the lapped zipper technique.

About the fabric:  This is an amazing very lightweight ivory wool suiting from Emma One Sock, that is Helmut Lang/Theory.  It would make incredible wide legged pants, but you definitely need to line it.  Last I checked, she still had some available.  This wool is well made and a treat to work with.  I lined it with a matching silk crepe de chine, also from Emma One Sock.

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Paco Peralta 8-gore skirt in ivory wool.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s