Vintage & Antique Sewing

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This weekend, we traveled.  We went north to a very hot, and very humid Charlotte, NC for my in-laws 50th wedding anniversary. I have a post later this week about the dress I made for it.  On the way back to relatively cool Florida, we stopped at the old family farm in upstate South Carolina to clean out my late grandparents house.  Or try anyway.

In the four-generation picture above, my grandmother Margaret is on the left, and oldest woman is my great-grandmother, Marie, who owned the house before my grandmother.  But the sewing items I found at the house also tell the story of my mother, and of one of my great-great grandmothers.

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I’m not sure who these thimbles belonged to, but most likely my great-grandmother.  I found them in a jar in the kitchen, and I think the jar had been in the attic. I’d love to ask my mother, but sadly, her memory is being robbed of her. I put them in my pocket and fidgeted with them the rest of the day.  They are bent, as if shaped to great-grandma Marie’s finger.  I’ve never mastered using a thimble, but these felt good on my fingers.  I loved her dearly.  She was my earliest sewing teacher.  (“Those stitches are beautiful, but these are not.  Keep your focus all the way through a project, don’t be lazy.”)  She also taught me crewel embroidery. Sadly, I never learned tatting, her specialty, but I have some of her  pieces.  Of all the things I brought home, these thimbles have the most sentimental value.

We also cleaned out the patterns.  Well, this occurred before I got there – my sister saved them from the trash. My sister said they found them in a suitcase in the attic. They’ve probably been there since the mid 70s, when the house was renovated.  She said they did have to throw out more than half the patterns because they were in such bad shape. Many of these envelopes are tattered and disintegrating.  Almost all of these were used – my grandmother actually used her patterns.

I only had one in my collection – the Balmain, which I got from my other grandmother.  Judging from the dates on the McCalls patterns and the styles/sizes, I think my grandmother was sewing mostly for my mother who would have been in high school/college.  My mother’s handwriting is on a few.  Still, my grandmother married very young, and the styles would have been fashionable for someone in their late 30s, early 40s.  I think my grandmother liked McCall’s best, given how many there were.

IMG_2440My grandmother clearly liked Spadea patterns. These are in pristine (but used) condition.  These patterns, and the catalogues above,  were still in the mailing envelopes.  The patterns were all mailed to Loring Air Force base, which dates them to the early 60s (I think 1961).  The catalogues were mailed to her at the farm, after she remarried, so it’s from the early 70s.  (My first grandfather died in his 40s, when I was 2.) I think she bought these designs for herself, as they were a bit more sophisticated and elegant than the many mod patterns from McCalls.

I knew this existed, and I had requested to have it when my grandfather passed away:

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But I didn’t know this still existed (terrible pix, no lighting, nor AC for that matter):

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Both are still at the farm.  My brother is going to get both (and all those parts to the left) and bring them to me, as our car was full.  I remember them being together and even using the treadle when I was very, very young.  But I thought the machine was lost.

The machine itself is in terrible condition.  Perhaps it’s just aesthetics, I won’t know til I get it out of the house. I think it may have been in the attic for the last 40 years.  The cabinet/treadle is in great shape, as it had been used as furniture since the mid 70s.  The drawers were still filled with acorns – my doing from when I was little.

I’m not sure who owned it.  My grandmother obviously got it from her mother, Marie.  But Marie’s life span doesn’t really overlap when these machines were made. Still, the house didn’t have plumbing til the 70s, so perhaps it had limited electricity as well.  Looking at when my great-grandmother lived (1861-1964), I’m thinking it was hers.  She also lived in that house in her gloriously long life.  It could have been my great-grandfather’s mother’s machine though (1872-1937).  I’ll never know.

I don’t have the faintest idea how to restore it or preserve the old patterns, but if anyone knows anything, please comment!  Likewise, if you know of any restorers in the north Florida area (or east Tennessee, where the machine will live with my brother for a while), please let me know!

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Vintage & Antique Sewing

  1. What a wonderful sewing collection from the family. For help on the machines, from simply stabilizing to full-on restoration, the Victorian Sweatshop is a fairly new forum for vintage/antique machine lovers. Also Treadle On, not quite as active though, and Yahoo groups, including ones for just about every brand of machine that ever existed. There are other good places, but I don’t have those bookmarks with me now

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